Eczema on Scalp
 

Nobody wants to deal with the effects of eczema, but it can be especially troublesome when you have eczema on your scalp. This article will go over what you need to know about scalp eczema as well as how to treat eczema on the scalp.

What Do I Need to Know About Eczema on Scalp?

Eczema is a skin disease that knows no bounds. It can break out anywhere on the body for a variety of reasons. That being said, eczema on the scalp can be particularly problematic.

Eczema of the scalp is known as seborrheic dermatitis. It’s a chronic condition and a particularly acute form of eczema. The symptoms of scalp eczema are more severe than those of eczema that appear elsewhere on the body.

The most common symptoms of eczema on the scalp include inflamed, itchy, red skin. The skin can be oily scaly or flaky and come off in dandruff patches.

The most common symptoms of eczema on the scalp include inflamed, itchy, red skin

Triggers or Causes of Scalp Eczema

Eczema is a genetic skin disease, meaning you cannot catch it or spread it to anyone else. The condition usually lies dormant in people until something happens that triggers the condition.

There are many factors that can trigger eczema, here are just a few.

Bacteria and fungus - Bacteria and fungus can both act as triggers for eczema. If either of these pathogens can infect your skin and cause a flare up, it’s possible that your eczema will be triggered.

Hormones - A hormonal imbalance can also cause your scalp to develop eczema. This likely explains why more people eventually grow out of eczema. As a teenager, your hormones rage, but as an adult, everything finds an equilibrium.

Sensitivity to yeast - Yeast is a specific kind of fungus that causes a lot of problems for people with eczema. If you’re sensitive to yeast than it’s likely going to trigger eczema if you have it.

Yeast is a specific kind of fungus that causes a lot of problems for people with eczema

Autoimmune diseases - Any sort of atypical immune system leaves you vulnerable to eczema outbreaks on the scalp and elsewhere. Whether the disease is as severe or common, any autoimmune disease can increase the chance of triggering your eczema.

Stress and fatigue - Whether you’ve been put under stress or denied a full night’s rest for an extended period of time, both can result in a breakout of eczema.

Treatments for Scalp Eczema

Eczema can be treated in a variety of ways from medication to natural remedies. Some treatment options will be more effective for some than for others.

If you’re looking for more natural ingredients try to help treat your eczema, try the following:

  • Zinc pyrithione
  • Salicylic acid
  • Selenium sulfide
  • Coal tar

Coal tar is an ingredient you will find in many eczema-treating shampoos. Doctors usually recommend that you leave the shampoo in your hair after lathering for anywhere between 5 and 10 minutes before rinsing it out. It’s important to follow your doctor’s or dermatologist’s instructions before using any special shampoos though.

Light therapy has also been found to help some people treat their eczema. The type of light therapy performed on patients with scalp eczema is called phototherapy.

There are other natural remedies like tea tree oil and aloe vera. Both have had soothing effects on irritated skin. Emuaid works in a similar fashion as well. It soothes irritated skin and can kill both bacteria and fungi which can trigger your eczema.

There are other natural remedies like tea tree oil and aloe vera

Aside from treatment, it’s recommended that you do not scratch your eczema breakout if you have one, avoid long showers or baths, and avoid any products that contain alcohol because they can further dry out the skin and make it flakey and peel.

Conclusion

Although no one solution will fix every instance of eczema, many people have found relief using Emuaid. Emuaid can help you prevent breakouts and soothe the scaly patches of skin your already have. Ask you doctor if they think Emuaid is right for you.