Is MRSA Contagious?
 

MRSA is a serious condition that can cause even more serious health problems if left unchecked.

In this article, we’ll explain what MRSA is, its causes, and its symptoms. We’ll also talk about whether or not MRSA is contagious and how to treat it.

What Is MRSA

 
MRSA is a type of bacteria. More specifically it’s a methicillin-resistant form of Staphylococcus aureus. If you have MRSA, then you have a type of staph infection.
 

MRSA is a type of bacteria. More specifically it’s a methicillin-resistant form of Staphylococcus aureus. If you have MRSA, then you have a type of staph infection.

Staph infections can be very serious and require near-immediate attention.

Staphylococcus Aureus is a common type of bacteria which is found on the skin and in the nose. Usually, Staphylococcus Aureus is non-threatening, and in most cases, when a paitient is infected with Staphylococcus Aureus, it can be treated with simple antibiotics. Most of the time a staph infection looks like a pustule or boil. It may be unsightly, but it’s easily treatable.

MRSA however, is different from other forms of Staphylococcus Aureus because of that aforementioned methicillin-resistance. MRSA is usually resistant to a variety of different antibiotics which makes it harder to treat.

Because of the nature of MRSA, it can quickly develop into something much more serious than a simple pustule or boil. MRSA can eventually result in such medical problems as soft tissue wound infections, bloodstream infections, and pneumonia.

This is why it’s so important to seek medical help from a doctor if you think there’s a possibility that you have MRSA.

Causes Of MRSA

As we’ve already mentioned, Staphylococcus Aureus is everywhere. The Staphylococcus Aureus bacteria is not inherently dangerous as long as it stays outside of your body.

 
It’s when Staphylococcus Aureus enters the body through an opening and begins to infect the patient that there are problems. MRSA usually enters the body through a cut. That could be a scratch in the nose, a break in the skin, or something else.
 

It’s when Staphylococcus Aureus enters the body through an opening and begins to infect the patient that there are problems. MRSA usually enters the body through a cut. That could be a scratch in the nose, a break in the skin, or something else.

This is why it’s so important to keep any and all wounds clean and sterile while they heal. If you do not actively try to keep your wounds clean, you’re increasing the likelihood that they will come into contact with bacteria like Staphylococcus Aureus.

Once MRSA enters the body it will start to grow and spread.

Symptoms Of MRSA

Usually, MRSA presents like other Staphylococcus Aureus infections.

The signs and symptoms of MRSA include:

  • Painful bumps on the skin
  • Pus and other fluids
  • Drainage
  • Fever-like symptoms
  • Redness
  • Swelling

Remember, even though a normal staph infection isn’t really dangerous, it still needs to be treated with antibiotics. So even if you don’t think you have MRSA, you should go and see a doctor if you present with these symptoms. The best case scenario is that you don’t have MRSA and you get some simple antibiotics to fix whatever it is you do have. The worst case scenario is that you have MRSA and you’re now receiving treatment.

Is MRSA Contagious

Yes. MRSA is incredibly contagious under the right circumstances.

A large percentage of the human population has MRSA bacteria on their body somewhere even though few of them are actually infected. Different strains of Staphylococcus Aureus simply live on our skin as naturally as we live on Earth.

 
You develop MRSA by coming into physical contact with the bacteria. So you can contract MRSA by touching someone that has the MRSA bacteria on them. That physical contact could be something as simple as a handshake to accidentally touching a wound.
 

You develop MRSA by coming into physical contact with the bacteria. So you can contract MRSA by touching someone that has the MRSA bacteria on them. That physical contact could be something as simple as a handshake to accidentally touching a wound.

You do not even have to touch them. Sharing certain personal effects can also increase your chances of coming into contact with MRSA. You should avoid sharing towels or clothes with someone who has MRSA.

Lastly, certain environments can naturally host the bacteria. Gyms and locker rooms are examples of places where MRSA bacteria may exist.

Most people who get MRSA have some sort of secondary condition. For example, it’s more common for someone who develops MRSA to have a weak immune system. Also, people who are staying in hospitals, nursing homes, and other healthcare facilities are more likely to develop the disease.

MRSA Treatment Options

Simple staph infections are treated by draining the cyst and possibly some light antibiotics. As long as you’re able to keep your skin clean, your staph infection should clear up pretty easily.

MRSA, on the other hand, is harder to treat.

MRSA usually requires some form of antibiotic therapy but treating MRSA can be tricky because of how resistant it is to different types of medications.

If you think you have MRSA, go to your doctor and get an official diagnosis. Once you’ve been officially diagnosed, your doctor will give you an antibiotic regimen to follow. Make sure you follow your regimen with exactness. Take your medicine as prescribed. If your doctor says to continue taking your antibiotics until you run out, do that. If they say to take them for a specific number of days, do that.

The point is that it can be difficult to treat MRSA, and any sort of variation in how you take your medicine can make MRSA that much more difficult to treat.

It’s also important to remember that you can take certain steps to minimize your chances of infection.

If you want to prevent MRSA, be sure to:

  • Wash your hands thoroughly and often with soap and water
  • Keep cuts and scrapes clean and bandaged until healed
  • Avoid contact with other people’s wounds
  • Avoid sharing personal items
  • Avoid whirlpools or swimming pools if you’re infected

Emuaid Can Help You Fight Against Infections

Once you have been infected with MRSA, you’ll need a doctor to prescribe you specific medications. But you can still take preventative measures like we said before.

Emuaid should be one of those preventative measures.

Emuaid is an all-natural, homeopathic ointment that has been found to help soothe skin, kill bacteria, and encourage healing. It’s been shown to help with a variety of skin conditions from dermatitis to psoriasis to eczema. This topical ointment has been shown to kill and neutralize bacteria, fungus and other harmful contaminants which can damage the skin and infect a patient's body.

Emuaid also encourages improved blood flow. Use it on the skin near a wound to help bring more biological materials to the sight of the injury fast so your body can speed up the healing process.

Ask your doctor if Emuaid is the right choice for you and your skin care needs.