Prurigo Nodularis Symptoms and Solutions

 

Skin diseases can be uncomfortable and embarrassing. Some conditions are worse than others and bring more discomfort. It’s important to determine which specific skin disease you are battling so that you can get the proper treatment and find the soothing relief you need. In this post, we’ll talk about a skin condition known as prurigo nodularis. We’ll review what it is, outline some potential risk factors, and propose some treatment solutions.

What is prurigo nodularis?

Prurigo nodularis (PN) is a relatively uncommon skin condition characterized by extremely itchy nodules about a half inch in diameter. It may be insightful to examine the origin of the words. Prurigo essentially means “itchy,” while nodularis refers to nodules. Also known as “picker’s nodules,” prurigo nodularis symptoms can worsen with picking and scratching. The skin disease mainly affects those middle-aged and older, it is chronic, and it can linger for many years. It typically manifests first on the arms and legs, but it can be found anywhere on the body. While it may be difficult to completely eliminate prurigo nodularis, significant relief can come if the right treatment is found and applied.

What is prurigo nodularis?

What are the symptoms of prurigo nodularis?

Prurigo nodularis can occasionally be confused with atopic dermatitis. However, PN is significantly different in that it manifests as nodules that are large and considerably itchy. Often, the itch is so severe that those who suffer from the disease scratch enough to create open sores and induce bleeding. This can cause infection and additional scaling and crusting. If patients continue to scratch, they may cause scarring.

What are the symptoms of prurigo nodularis?

What are the causes of prurigo nodularis?

Prurigo nodularis causes are largely unknown. However, those who have the disease have also been known to have any of a number of other conditions. While these are not necessarily prurigo nodularis causes, they might at least be considered risk factors.

  • Vitamin D deficiencies
  • History of atopic dermatitis or eczema
  • Psychiatric conditions including excessive stress, anxiety, and depression
  • Liver or kidney dysfunction
  • HIV
  • History of autoimmune disease

How is prurigo nodularis diagnosed?

It is possible to recognize the disease on your own, but it is advisable to speak with a physician to get a more certain diagnosis. Most often, a doctor can diagnose PN by simply visually examining the skin. In some cases, however, a skin biopsy is performed to rule out other skin conditions. Biopsies of lesions may show a high level of eosinophils, indicating the presence of the prurigo nodularis disease.

What is the best treatment for prurigo nodularis?

What is the best treatment for prurigo nodularis?

Often, doctors will prescribe antibiotics. In recent years, however, they have proved to have only limited effectiveness. Unfortunately, those who battle prurigo nodularis may suffer with the disease for many years. The best course of action, then, is to seek symptomatic relief. Antihistamines may help soothe itching, while topical ointments can help reduce scarring and promote the regrowth of skin cells. In some cases, light therapy can provide relief. Others opt to try freezing the nodules off. Generally, the best idea is to look for a solution that works with the body instead of against it. Seek a natural treatment for prurigo nodularis symptoms and you’ll find that your body will respond most favorably.