Thrombosed Hemorrhoids: Overview, Causes, and Treatments
 

Everybody knows that hemorrhoids are a real pain to deal with. But thrombosed hemorrhoids are even worse. This article will go into the differences between regular hemorrhoids and thrombosed hemorrhoids as well as the symptoms, causes, and treatments for this more severe hemorrhoidal condition.

Regular Hemorrhoids vs Thrombosed Hemorrhoids

A regular hemorrhoid is an enlarged blood vessel that is either located inside or outside of the anal canal.

A thrombosed hemorrhoid is characterized by a large clot that has formed within a regular hemorrhoid. This causes the growth to increase in size and become significantly more painful than usual. A thrombosed hemorrhoid is much more severe than otherwise inflamed anal tissue.

Symptoms of this condition include:

  • Itching and swelling around the anus
  • Pain near, in, or around the anus
  • Bleeding during a bowel movement

It’s possible that having thrombosed tissue can lead to severe discomfort during day-to-day activities. It may make simple activities like sitting uncomfortable. Your ability to sit, stand, and use the bathroom can all be affected by blood clots in the anal tissue.

Your ability to sit, stand, and use the bathroom can all be affected by blood clots in the anal tissue.
 

Causes of Thrombosed Hemorrhoids

There are several factors that can be the cause of a thrombosed hemorrhoid.

Some of the following are possible causes:

Constipation - If you develop hemorrhoids, it is not enough to simply change your diet. You also have to actively try and soften your stools to make it easier for your digestive tract to heal. Constipation, even when it happens after changing your diet, can cause thrombosed tissue to occur. In order to avoid constipation, try taking mild stool softeners alongside increasing your fiber intake. The easier it is for you to have a bowel movement, the less you have to worry about your condition worsening and the more your body can focus on healing.

Pushing too hard during a bowel movement - Similar to constipation, pushing too hard, in general, can make a problem get worse over time. Try to take it easy when in the bathroom Again, stool softeners and increasing your fiber will help you with this. Also shifting your position somewhat when going to the bathroom may help lessen the need to push as hard.

Pregnancy - A baby is great but the reality is that carrying a baby to term can cause different health problems for the mother. This is part of why there is that stereotype of pregnant women needing to go to the bathroom every five minutes. A baby can, more or less, sit on the bladder triggering the need to go more and more often. The weight of a baby in pregnant women can cause increased pressure on the anal passage, increasing the chances of thrombosed hemorrhoids. If you think you’re having this problem, talk to your doctor. Your OBGYN can help make recommendations on how to relieve the pressure and lessen the severity of any baby-related health problems.

The weight of a baby in pregnant women can cause increased pressure on the anal passage, increasing the chances of thrombosed hemorrhoids.
 

Excessive sitting - Sitting for long periods of time is bad for you. It can cause back problems, obesity, metabolic syndrome, and increased blood pressure. Excessive sitting can also cause hemorrhoids. This problem can be complicated if you sit for an extended period of time while on the toilet. Even though it’s common practice to bring your phone with you to the bathroom, it may be better for your health to go tech-free whenever possible.

Age - The older you are, the longer it takes your body to heal. That’d partially because the immune system weakens as we age and it’s also because blood flow gets worse over time. Either way, simply aging increases your chances of developing a thrombosed hemorrhoid. Your doctor can help you avoid future problems as you age. Additionally, products like Emuaid can help increase blood flow allowing the body to heal faster. A combination of Emuaid and your doctor’s suggestions will likely help you prevent health issues into the future.

Treatments for Thrombosed Hemorrhoids

There are several treatment options for people with thrombosed hemorrhoids. The different treatment opportunities range in severity.

Here are the treatment options you should discuss with your doctor:

  • Warm baths
  • Loose fitting clothing
  • Stool softeners
  • Fiber supplements
  • Pain relievers
  • Hemorrhoid creams like Emuaid
  • Ice
  • Surgery

Surgeries include thrombectomies, hemorrhoidectomies, and stapled hemorrhoidopexy.

A thrombectomy is a minor procedure where they cut into the tissue to get rid of the blood clot and excessive blood found in the blood vessel.

A thrombectomy is a minor procedure where they cut into the tissue to get rid of the blood clot and excessive blood found in the blood vessel.
 

A hemorrhoidectomy is more invasive than a thrombectomy where the entire external hemorrhoid is removed rather than simply lanced.

A stapled hemorrhoidopexy is the most invasive surgery and requires general anesthesia. Basically, the physician or surgeon goes into the anal cavity and staples the hemorrhoid into place so it cannot cause further damage or be further damaged itself.

Conclusion

Nobody wants to deal with hemorrhoids. They’re painful and embarrassing. However, they are treatable. Hopefully, now you feel more prepared to deal with a thrombosed hemorrhoid if you ever have to.